KineMan: Web App

Track who’s buying politicians with “Greenhouse” browser add-on | Ars Technica Nicholas Rubin, a 16-year-old programmer from Seattle, has created a browser add-on that makes it incredibly easy to see the influence of money in US politics. Rubin calls the add-on Greenhouse, and …

Unclutter - ArchWiki

Raspberry Pi as low-cost HD surveillance camera share what you made with text, photos, video, and files…

HOWTO Use Python in the web — Python v2.7.8 documentation This document shows how Python fits into the web. It presents some ways to integrate Python with a web server, and general practices useful for developing web sites.…

The source of Burroughs’s centipede fixation lies, most likely, in his Mexico City days. In 1949, he enrolled, on the G.I. bill, at Mexico City College, where classes were taught in English. He took Spanish classes and, following his longstanding interest in anthropology, courses with the pioneering anthropologist R.H. Barlow, “learning to speak Mayan, and taking a course in the Codices” he claimed, in a letter to his friend Allen Ginsberg.

Barlow was a singular figure: a trailblazer in his field, fluent in the Aztec language of Nahuatl and an authority on Mayan codices, he was, in an unlikely coincidence, a boyhood friend of H.P. Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard, creator of Conan the Barbarian. A writer of weird tales himself, he ended up the executor of Lovecraft’s literary estate. To complicate matters, he was also a closeted homosexual, haunted by the “subtle feeling that my curious and uneasy life is not destined to prolong itself.” Too true: a student with a grudge exposed him; convinced the ensuing scandal would ruin him, Barlow locked himself in his room and swallowed 26 Seconal capsules. Pinned to his door, his suicide note read: “Do not disturb me. I want to sleep a long time.” It was written, in an act of commendable aestheticism, in Mayan pictographs.*